Artist, musician and researcher exploring the possibilities of meaning and context presented through sound and its materiality in relation to digital and audio technologies

installation

Sound Envelope HK-LDN

Sound Envelope HK-LDN 聲音信封 香港-倫敦 (2021)
Virtual exhibition with immersive audio as part of SPARK 2021 online festival supported by the British Council. Recommended browser: Chrome.

Led by Ryo Ikeshiro (SoundLab, School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong) and Tom Tlalim (Creative Research, Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts London), with Dawn Scarfe and András Blazsek. Virtual exhibition by MetaObjects.

Sound Envelope uses field recordings and listening as a framework for encouraging dialogue and artistic and cultural exchange between Hong Kong and London – cities that are geographically remote but share a long history. The act of listening attentively whilst recording, playing back and mixing field recordings can make one attuned to subtle variations in our everyday sound environment, and become receptive to those of others. The title references the Asian tradition of giving money in envelopes, to wish for well-being and good fortune. The project is built on the notion of giving sounds as a gift, as a framework for artistic collaboration and exchange.

A diverse group of residents from Hong Kong and London including students from the City University Hong Kong and the University of the Arts London took part in workshops on sound and listening and created field recordings in their vicinity. The recordings were then shared amongst the participants in order to listen to a variety of sound worlds from the two cities to initiate conversation on their lives and experiences. Using the shared field recordings from Hong Kong and London, each participant has created a soundscape, presented here in a virtual exhibition. Visitors are free to click on the images in order to listen to each soundscape separately, or to walk around the exhibition space to hear an immersive mix of soundscapes close by.

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bug

bug 蛣聽器 (2021)
Sound installation with Ambisonics field recordings, directional speakers, lasers and computer

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dugeundoki

dugeundoki 讀緊到期 (2018/2021)
Immersive installation with multi-channel projections and audio and TV monitor

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(Re)constructing Voices

(2018)
Installation with audio, printer and paper, and wall displays
In collaboration with Aron Rossman-Kiss

Based on a huge audio archive of testimonies from participants and statistics of victims from the Yugoslav Wars, the work questions the modalities of presenting this material as well as the power structures that condition their use and dissemination. Ironic and grave, it is both a memorial in the making and a reminder that describing events simply as “war” risks glossing over the imbalances, intricacies and causes of the conflicts. In conjunction with the uncanny ability of algorithmically-generated “fake” text to function as testimonies, the work serves to highlight the complexities inherent in the use of such material within the public sphere, education and documentary research.

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Localising Borders

(2017/2018)
Sound installation and performance

Sound is generally assumed to diffuse and fill an environment and be omnidirectional. Light is assumed to travel in a straight line and be more amenable to being directed such as in a laser or even a torch or a spotlight. We may not be able to see around a corner but we can hear around a corner. Ultrasound provides one means by which sound can be more directional and behave more similarly to how we imagine light to be, allowing us almost to “see” via sound.

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New Town

(2017)
Installation with video, 360-video with ambisonic audio and directional audio

The work explores various effects of the regeneration of Susaek-dong and Sangam-dong, Seoul, in sound.

Onomatopoeia are especially common in Japanese and Korean. Whereas their use in Indo-European languages is often considered superficial and childish and limited to providing effect, it provides a rich source of vocabulary integral to the East Asian languages where their use is much more common and varied. There are also many onomatopoeia (or “ideophones”) in both languages to describe phenomena which do not produce sounds e.g. how things look or feel and emotions.

Being literally untranslatable at times, it could be considered as an example of sounds contributing to the notion of Otherness of East Asia in general. It also operates in a symbolic realm not entirely based on conventional semantics. The practice of making the inaudible audible developed over centuries provides a fruitful source for rethinking sound and its presence beyond language and the purely symbolic.

Part 1 consists of a video of interviews carried out in Suil Market and the surrounding area. Interviewees were asked to describe Susaek using ideophones.

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JUST BE CREATIVE.

A sonic revitalisation of Księży Młyn, Łódź
(2017)
Installation with projection, monitors and directional audio

Documentation

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