This is the homepage of artist, musician and researcher Ryo Ikeshiro who works with audio and time-based media to explore possibilities of thinking through sound.

installation

(Re)constructing Voices

In collaboration with Aron Rossman-Kiss

Based on a huge audio archive of testimonies from participants and statistics of victims from the Yugoslav Wars, the work questions the modalities of presenting this material as well as the power structures that condition their use and dissemination. Ironic and grave, it is both a memorial in the making and a reminder that describing events simply as “war” risks glossing over the imbalances, intricacies and causes of the conflicts. In conjunction with the uncanny ability of algorithmically-generated “fake” text to function as testimonies, the work serves to highlight the complexities inherent in the use of such material within the public sphere, education and documentary research.

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Localising Borders

Sound installation and performance

Sound is generally assumed to diffuse and fill an environment and be omnidirectional. Light is assumed to travel in a straight line and be more amenable to being directed such as in a laser or even a torch or a spotlight. We may not be able to see around a corner but we can hear around a corner. Ultrasound provides one means by which sound can be more directional and behave more similarly to how we imagine light to be, allowing us almost to “see” via sound.

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New Town

Installation with video, 360-video with ambisonic audio and directional audio

The work explores various effects of the regeneration of Susaek-dong and Sangam-dong, Seoul, in sound.

Onomatopoeia are especially common in Japanese and Korean. Whereas their use in Indo-European languages is often considered superficial and childish and limited to providing effect, it provides a rich source of vocabulary integral to the East Asian languages where their use is much more common and varied. There are also many onomatopoeia (or “ideophones”) in both languages to describe phenomena which do not produce sounds e.g. how things look or feel and emotions.

Being literally untranslatable at times, it could be considered as an example of sounds contributing to the notion of Otherness of East Asia in general. It also operates in a symbolic realm not entirely based on conventional semantics. The practice of making the inaudible audible developed over centuries provides a fruitful source for rethinking sound and its presence beyond language and the purely symbolic.

Part 1 consists of a video of interviews carried out in Suil Market and the surrounding area. Interviewees were asked to describe Susaek using ideophones.

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JUST BE CREATIVE.

A sonic revitalisation of Księży Młyn, Łódź

Documentation

 

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The Mental Health Noise Orchestra

Sound, noise and listening workshops and performances for people with mental disabilities and health issues

The Mental Health Noise Orchestra challenges public preconceptions concerning people with mental disabilities and health issues by demonstrating their potential for creativity and experimentation. Through workshops, the participants open their ears to the possibilities of sound and noise through listening. They culminate in performances which also confront the audience’s notions of what music and musicality are or should be shaped by the music industry and elitist traditions.

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Pika! Ppeonjjeog, Pika! Ppeonjjeog / Ppiikkaa!! PPppeeoonnjjjjeeoogg

Immsersive audiovisual installation with 3D-engraving and printing

Click on images to view as slideshow.

 

 

The Korean and Japanese languages contain many onomatopoeia to describe phenomena which produce no sound e.g. how things look or feel and emotions. This mixed-media installation is based on this practice of “sound symbolism” of silent phenomena.

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Ethnic Diversity in Sites of Cultural Activity

Interactive audiovisual installation

Ethnic Diversity in Sites of Cultural Activity poses the question of whether computers can be racist by highlighting the potential for discrimination of face recognition technology. The interactive installation consists of a computer, a web camera, speakers, projectors and lamps. It locates faces, detects skin colour and alters the sound and image produced depending on the ethnic diversity of the visitors to the exhibition. Different music is selected depending on where the work is exhibited. The piece was originally developed in Vienna where it morphed between Fela Kuti’s Zombie for dark skin and Johann Strauss II’s the Blue Danube performed by the Vienna Philharmonic for light skin in reference to the orchestra’s lack of ethnic and gender diversity.

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Composition: White Square, White Circle

Available in limited edition digital format from Sedition.

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Challa

Soundtrack to audiovisual installation in collaboration with Meital Covo.

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PulseCubes


PulseCubes
– interactive sound installation demo

PulseCubes is an interactive sound installation. Visitors are invited to become part of an implicit feedback loop whose other components include a set of small cubes on a flat surface, computer vision and digital signal processing. The cubes are tracked by a web camera positioned overhead and processed through a partially opaque system implemented in the programming environment Max/MSP/Jitter.

Visitors have the opportunity to influence and interfere with the notion of time by playing with the cubes. Their placement and movement affect features of the audio such as rhythm, tempo and synthesis parameters as the passage of time is stretched and constricted. A chain of indelible “traces” are left in the position of the cubes and the resulting sonic environment and physical vibrations.

PulseCubes was part of The Dissolving Cube at the Portman Gallery, London in Nov-Dec 2009, re:new Digital Arts Festival, Copenhagen in May 2010 and Sound Travels Festival of Sound Art, Toronto in Aug 2012.


The Dissolving Cube
opening night, featuring PulseCubes


David Tudor’s Rainforest IV

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Tudor’s seminal work from the 1970s is a template for what is now called sound art today. It involves resonating sound sculptures, audience interactivity, collaboration, use of found objects and feedback loops and networks.

The group installation/performance took place in Area 10 Project Space in Peckham. It was a former Whitten’s warehouse which was used as an event space for several years before being closed for demolition and subsequent redevelopment.

All the material used for the sound sculptures were found within the vicinity of Area 10 which included remains from the timber warehouse, discarded objects from building and development sites and general junk. The event took place within the backdrop of the changing landscape of Peckham and the tide of gentrification that was to follow.