Artist, musician and researcher exploring the possibilities of meaning and context presented through sound and its materiality in relation to digital and audio technologies

interactive

Sound Envelope HK-LDN

Sound Envelope HK-LDN 聲音信封 香港-倫敦 (2021)
Virtual exhibition with immersive audio as part of SPARK 2021 online festival supported by the British Council. Recommended browser: Chrome.

Led by Ryo Ikeshiro (SoundLab, School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong) and Tom Tlalim (Creative Research, Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts London), with Dawn Scarfe and András Blazsek. Virtual exhibition by MetaObjects.

Sound Envelope uses field recordings and listening as a framework for encouraging dialogue and artistic and cultural exchange between Hong Kong and London – cities that are geographically remote but share a long history. The act of listening attentively whilst recording, playing back and mixing field recordings can make one attuned to subtle variations in our everyday sound environment, and become receptive to those of others. The title references the Asian tradition of giving money in envelopes, to wish for well-being and good fortune. The project is built on the notion of giving sounds as a gift, as a framework for artistic collaboration and exchange.

A diverse group of residents from Hong Kong and London including students from the City University Hong Kong and the University of the Arts London took part in workshops on sound and listening and created field recordings in their vicinity. The recordings were then shared amongst the participants in order to listen to a variety of sound worlds from the two cities to initiate conversation on their lives and experiences. Using the shared field recordings from Hong Kong and London, each participant has created a soundscape, presented here in a virtual exhibition. Visitors are free to click on the images in order to listen to each soundscape separately, or to walk around the exhibition space to hear an immersive mix of soundscapes close by.

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Ethnic Diversity in Sites of Cultural Activity

(2014 – ongoing)
Interactive audiovisual installation

Ethnic Diversity in Sites of Cultural Activity poses the question of whether computers can be racist by highlighting the potential for discrimination of face recognition technology. The interactive installation consists of a computer, a web camera, speakers, projectors and lamps. It locates faces, detects skin colour and alters the sound and image produced depending on the ethnic diversity of the visitors to the exhibition. Different music is selected depending on where the work is exhibited. The piece was originally developed in Vienna where it morphed between Fela Kuti’s Zombie for dark skin and Johann Strauss II’s the Blue Danube performed by the Vienna Philharmonic for light skin in reference to the orchestra’s lack of ethnic and gender diversity.

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PulseCubes


PulseCubes
– interactive sound installation demo

PulseCubes is an interactive sound installation. Visitors are invited to become part of an implicit feedback loop whose other components include a set of small cubes on a flat surface, computer vision and digital signal processing. The cubes are tracked by a web camera positioned overhead and processed through a partially opaque system implemented in the programming environment Max/MSP/Jitter.

Visitors have the opportunity to influence and interfere with the notion of time by playing with the cubes. Their placement and movement affect features of the audio such as rhythm, tempo and synthesis parameters as the passage of time is stretched and constricted. A chain of indelible “traces” are left in the position of the cubes and the resulting sonic environment and physical vibrations.

PulseCubes was part of The Dissolving Cube at the Portman Gallery, London in Nov-Dec 2009, re:new Digital Arts Festival, Copenhagen in May 2010 and Sound Travels Festival of Sound Art, Toronto in Aug 2012.


The Dissolving Cube
opening night, featuring PulseCubes