This is the homepage of artist, musician and researcher Ryo Ikeshiro who works with audio and time-based media to explore possibilities of thinking through sound.

projection

Live soundtrack to Tony Conrad’s The Flicker

Live performance of soundtrack to film projection of Tony Conrad’s The Flicker, with Hangjun Lee.

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JUST BE CREATIVE.

A sonic revitalisation of Księży Młyn, Łódź

Documentation

 

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Girls! Girls! Girls! Girls! Boys!

Five Teletext art pages created for the International Teletext Art Festival – ITAF2015

ikeshiro_lenna_2

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Ethnic Diversity in Sites of Cultural Activity

Interactive audiovisual installation

Ethnic Diversity in Sites of Cultural Activity poses the question of whether computers can be racist by highlighting the potential for discrimination of face recognition technology. The interactive installation consists of a computer, a web camera, speakers, projectors and lamps. It locates faces, detects skin colour and alters the sound and image produced depending on the ethnic diversity of the visitors to the exhibition. Different music is selected depending on where the work is exhibited. The piece was originally developed in Vienna where it morphed between Fela Kuti’s Zombie for dark skin and Johann Strauss II’s the Blue Danube performed by the Vienna Philharmonic for light skin in reference to the orchestra’s lack of ethnic and gender diversity.

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Real-Time GENDYN Audiovisualisation

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Construction in Kneading

Live audiovisualisation of a Mandelbox fractal.

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Challa

Soundtrack to audiovisual installation in collaboration with Meital Covo.

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Construction in Zhuangzi

Audiovisual work based on a modified Lorenz dynamical system.

Construction in Zhuangzi is a live “audiovisualisation”: the simultaneous sonification and visualisation of the same process and data in real-time. It is based on a modified Lorenz dynamical system, a three-dimensional model of convection that is non-linear and chaotic and has sensitive dependence on initial conditions or the “butterfly effect”.

A performance consists of an attempt at understanding and controlling the mechanisms of the near-autonomous generative system through an improvisation involving the modifications of the parameters of the Lorenz. Moments of human intervention are indicated by a colour inversion and an audio click. Lorenz stated that the equations do not produce realistic representations at large values of the parameters of the equations. In the work, these parameters are taken to beyond their original real-world limits in order to explore a speculative world. An appropriately machinic or post-human sensibility is evoked through a digital noise/glitch presentation of the emergent phenomena.

The work is featured in the Electronic Music volume of the Cambridge Introductions to Music series. A fixed-media version of the work was awarded 2nd prize at the Fresh Minds Festival, TX, and was part of the official selection for Videomedeja – 16th International Video Festival and MADATAC 04 Contemporary New Media Audio-Visual Arts Festival.

For more details, see the article “Audiovisual Harmony: The realtime audiovisualisation of a single data source in Construction in Zhuangzi Organised Sound 17(2), 2012. It is also featured in the Electronic Music volume of the Cambridge Introductions to Music series.


A-B-A

29.06.2011
Japan earthquake and tsunami relief fund raiser

6 – 8 pm Wednesday 29 June 2011
Small Hall/Cinema, Richard Hoggart Building
Goldsmiths College, Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW

Tom Mudd feedback joypad

Ryo Ikeshiro new generative audiovisual work

Manabu Shimada glitched field recordings

The earthquake and tsunami of 11 March in Japan and subsequent after shocks have claimed over 15,000 lives, with 8,700 missing. Over 270,000 homes suffered damage, and almost 150,000 homes were completely or partially destroyed. Two months on, more than 100,000 are still living in evacuation shelters. The international response has certainly helped in starting the relief operation, but there is still much to be done. Any donations will be gratefully received.

The series will present two performances of each work with a talk/discussion in between. Program notes or explanations heard prior to experiencing a piece of music can sometimes affect how we listen in an unnatural way. On the other hand, they can give us useful pointers in appreciating music that might otherwise be difficult. Having two performances is a way of hopefully resolving these issues, with the first listening being unspoilt and the second more informed.

Please join us at any point in the evening. For the discussion, see links for blurbs and related articles. With kind support from EMS and SPR.

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David Tudor’s Rainforest IV

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Tudor’s seminal work from the 1970s is a template for what is now called sound art today. It involves resonating sound sculptures, audience interactivity, collaboration, use of found objects and feedback loops and networks.

The group installation/performance took place in Area 10 Project Space in Peckham. It was a former Whitten’s warehouse which was used as an event space for several years before being closed for demolition and subsequent redevelopment.

All the material used for the sound sculptures were found within the vicinity of Area 10 which included remains from the timber warehouse, discarded objects from building and development sites and general junk. The event took place within the backdrop of the changing landscape of Peckham and the tide of gentrification that was to follow.